Chapel Royal St. James N/A

The Chapel Royal is an ecclesiastical body of clergy, singers and vestry officers appointed to serve the spiritual needs of the country's reigning sovereign. It is a department of the Ecclesiastical Household, formally known as the royal "Free Chapel of the Household". The household is further divided into two parts: an ecclesiastical household each for Scotland and England, belonging to the Church of Scotland and the Church of England respectively.
The English Chapel Royal emerged as a distinct body by the eleventh century. The first full description of the chapel, describing twenty-six chaplains and clerks, comes from the fifteenth century, during the reign of Edward IV.
In their early history, the English and Scottish Chapels Royal travelled, like the rest of the court, with the monarch and performed wherever he or she was residing at the time. The existing records of the Chapel Royal go back to 1135, and, apart from the interregnum from 1649 to 1660, the choir has an uninterrupted history
The chapel building in St James's Palace was built in 1532. It was out of use during the reigns of the later Stuarts, as their Court was at Whitehall. However with the destruction of the Palace of Whitehall in 1698, since 1702 the chapel has been based at St James's Palace. Located in the main block of the Palace, it was built circa 1540 and altered since, most notably by Sir Robert Smirke in 1837. Its ceiling, richly decorated with royal initials and coats of arms, is said to have been painted by Holbein.

Stamp(s) Stamp Information
Chapel Royal St. James (Stamp 1) Monogram: G R R G
Coronet: Imperial
Monogram: G R R G
Coronet: Imperial
Monogram: G R R G
Coronet: Imperial
Monogram: G R R G
Coronet: Imperial
Monogram: G R R G
Coronet: Imperial crown