Unidentified Stamps

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Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram B S
Possibilities for Identification: 
The most likely candidate is Barbara Webb (d. 1819), wife of Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 5th Earl of Shaftesbury, married 1786.
Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram M H Coronet of an Earl
Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram R A R Coronet of an Earl
Unidentified Stamp
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Arms Two keys in pale Crest A dragon’s head couped Initials A W Helmet of a knight
Possibilities for Identification: 
Fairbairn’s Crests gives several examples of a dragon’s or wyvern’s head crest, but none of them corresponds to the arms described in Burke’s General armory. Despite the fact that the second initial is W, this stamp might be of continental origin.
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Unidentified Stamp
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Initial B Coronet of an Earl
Possibilities for Identification: 
In 1696 the initial and coronet suggest the following British earls, Bedford (Russell), Bridgewater (Egerton), Bristol (Digby), Bolingbroke (St John), Berkshire (Howard), Banbury (Knowles), Bath (Grenville), Burlington (Boyle), Berkeley, and Bradford (Newport). The style of the stamp suggests that it is contemporary to the book. The style of the initial B is very similar to that used by the Dukes of Buccleuch. However, Anne Scott, Countess of Buccleuch should be discounted, since she used the title for only 3 years, 1661-1663, when she married James Croft who became the Duke of Buccleuch.
Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram B R C
Possibilities for Identification: 
This is not the stamp of Bernard Capes of Winchester in Hampshire, the novelist, as suggested by Clements. The Christian names of Capes were Edward Joseph. There are no book collectors with the initials B R C to be found in Hazlitt's Roll of Honour. However, the latter source does list Benjamin Coulson Robinson, sergeant-at-arms (1812-1890).
Unidentified Stamp
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Initial C Coronet of an Earl
Unidentified Stamp
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Initial C Coronet of a Earl
Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram C H
Unidentified Stamp
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Crest A stag trippant Monogram C H
Possibilities for Identification: 
Fairbairn’s Crests plate 117/8 provides the following names to this stamp: Hand; Hart; Hindman; Hughes; Hutchison
Heraldic Charges: 
Unidentified Stamp
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Crest On a chapeau turned up ermine a lion passant crowned, collared, charged on the breast with a mullet Initials C K
Possibilities for Identification: 
Not in Fairbairn's Crests. Encyclopaedia heraldica, and Burke's General armory give King (Leicestershire) as the only crest belonging to a person whose surname begins with K. But the lion is neither collared or crowned.
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Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram C M S
Possibilities for Identification: 
Hazlitt lists two possibilities: Charles Manley Smith of the Middle Temple; and Charles Manner Sutton, Archbishop of Canterbury, whose bookplate is dated 1805. Without further evidence, this stamp remains unidentified.
Unidentified Stamp
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Initials C P
Unidentified Stamp
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Initials C S
Possibilities for Identification: 
Unidentified by the National Art Library
Unidentified Stamp
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Initial D Crest An arm in armour embowed holding a serpent Motto BY MY ANCESTORS MERIT
Possibilities for Identification: 
Not in Fairbairn’s Crests. Clements identifies the stamp as belonging to the Denis family. Burke’s General armory: Peter Denis – a hand grasping a snake, but not an arm in armour embowed
Heraldic Charges: 
Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram D C
Possibilities for Identification: 
Hazlitt’s list contains the following possible candidates: Daniel Craster, of Craster, Northumberland (d. 1702); David Crichton (born 1650); Sir David Cunynghame (d. 1708).
Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram D(?) C L Crest A leopard (lion?) rampant
Possibilities for Identification: 
Leopard rampant not in Fairbairn’s Crests. The only candidate in Papworth is Lincolne, but the entry has insufficient evidence.
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Unidentified Stamp
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Arms Per saltire four cinquefoils in fess point an annulet for difference Motto CVM DEI ESTIS I CORT Initials D F
Possibilities for Identification: 
The stamp has been attributed to David Ferguson, Minister of Dunfermline and to David Forrest, Master of the Scottish Mint and Edinburgh Antiquary. The motto is from I Corinthians Chapter 3. It is uncertain whether this is intended to be parted per saltire or whether it is intended to be a saltire between. There are some Scottish armorials of which the ground is parted per saltire, and many who bear a saltire, some between four roses. The family of Napier is one of the latter, but none have a surname that begins with an F
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Unidentified Stamp
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Monogram D Y C Coronet of an Earl
Possibilities for Identification: 
The monogram is clearly a separate block from the palm branches and the coronet that accompany it. Maggs comments ‘The College of Arms cannot find any Earldom of the period where the initials D Y C would be appropriate.
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Monogram E B B E Motto Iατρειον ψυχης
Possibilities for Identification: 
This is the stamp of the Swede Erik Benzelius (1675-1743), librarian of Uppsala University library from 1702 to 1723. The phrase was reported by Hecataeus of Abdera, a historian of the early third century B.C., to be an inscription on the sacred library of the tomb complex of Osymandyas (Ramses II), at Thebes. It is quoted by Diodorus Siculus (Diodorus of Sicily) in his Library of History (Biblioqhks Istorikhs), Book I, paragraph 49, line 3.

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